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Constitutional Initiative 128 (Ballot Issue #14)

Constitutional Initiative 128 Action Item

The Law and Justice Legislative Interim Committee was supposed to have a two-week period to go over Ballot Issue #14, but that was circumvented.  As a result, Planned Parenthood was authorized to begin petitioning to gather the necessary signatures to qualify for the November ballot on 4/5/24.  The name is now listed as CI-128 (Ballot Issue #14) on the Secretary of State website.  Please let us know if you see a petitioner gathering signatures.  There are many initiatives currently in the signature gathering stage so only report gatherers for CI 128 to info@prolifemontana.com.

 

The Law and Justice Legislative Interim Committee is still going to meet on April 18, 2024 at 9:00 AM via ZOOM, and this is a  VERY IMPORTANT MEETING that YOU can attend and LET YOUR VOICE BE HEARD.  You will need to register no later than April 16, and you can also share written testimony.  As a matter of fact, doing both would be ideal.  You’ll find the link to register below.

 

Register to testify via Zoom here:

https://www.leg.mt.gov/committees/interim/ljic/meeting-info/remote-participation-ljic/

 

The link to provide written testimony is here:

https://www.leg.mt.gov/committees/interim/ljic/public-comments-ljic/

 

Please note:  If you register to testify, and don’t receive a response by the morning of the 18th, call Rachel Weiss at 406.444.5367.  Again, you are strongly encouraged to do both the zoom and written testimony.  This is your opportunity to tell your legislators your concerns about CI 128. You can use some of the talking points on the CI 128 flyer if you’d like or contact us at info@prolifemontana.com for more information.

National News

(Live Action) – “Earlier this month, Ohio voted to enshrine abortion as a ‘right’ in its state constitution. Three other states have done likewise in the last year, including California, Michigan, and Vermont, where killing children in the womb at any point in pregnancy is now a protected action. In Kentucky, residents voted against an amendment stating that their constitution does not protect a right to killing preborn children. In Kansas, residents voted against clarifying their state constitution’s language to protect preborn children. In our own state, voters shot down efforts to protect even abortion survivors. To accomplish these feats, abortion proponents had to convince the majority of voters that women have a ‘right’ to dead children, and they had to erase the casualties of that ‘right’ entirely. Erasing the primary victim is easy in the abortion debate. These victims can’t march down streets carrying posters and chanting for their equal rights – because they’re dead. They were killed without the opportunity to even cry out. Their bodies were then buried — not in proper graves, but hidden and disposed of in medical waste facilities, dumpsters, and the sewer system after being brutally suctioned, dismembered, or injected with lethal drugs. They cannot speak for themselves, but photos speak for them.

History of Abortion

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